Wildlife – Wildlifepower http://wildlifepower.com Your source of information on wildlife conservation worldwide Thu, 15 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.9 http://wildlifepower.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/cropped-African-Forest-Elephant-32x32.jpg Wildlife – Wildlifepower http://wildlifepower.com 32 32 We All Live Downstream – Don’t roll back the clean water rule http://wildlifepower.com/clean-water-rule/ Thu, 15 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=8938 President Trump has said that he wants the nation to have clean water and it would be hard to find anyone who would disagree with that. However, last week, the Administration released an executive order that would take the country in the opposite direction — rolling back a rule aimed at bettering the drinking water […]

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President Trump has said that he wants the nation to have clean water and it would be hard to find anyone who would disagree with that.

However, last week, the Administration released an executive order that would take the country in the opposite direction — rolling back a rule aimed at bettering the drinking water supplies of roughly one in three Americans.

The order goes beyond just rolling back the Clean Water Rule, however. What’s really unusual about this order is that it directs the Environmental Protection Agency to consider Justice Antonin Scalia’s opinion in Rapanos v United States, a 2006 Supreme Court case, when rewriting a rule that defines which waters are protected by the Clean Water Act. The majority of the Supreme Court rejected this approach as inconsistent with the Clean Water Act. Collin O’Mara, President and CEO of the National Wildlife Federation, said in a statement:

This is an approach that the Supreme Court has previously rejected, specifically because it is not based upon sound science, is inconsistent with letter and spirit of the Clean Water Act as passed by Congress, and does not follow existing case law. It will be struck down by the Court eventually, but in the meantime our waters will have fewer protections. America can do better and we urge the administration to fulfill its promise of ‘crystal clear water.’

Please let President Trump know that you want him to protect clean water and wildlife by retweeting and liking the following tweet:

The splintered 2006 decision created confusion over how to determine whether the Clean Water Act applies to America’s smaller streams and wetlands – waters that provide important fish and wildlife habitat and fuel our nation’s drinking water supply. Justice Anthony Kennedy’s opinion — setting out a “significant nexus” test — has been considered the guiding standard to determine whether a water can be protected under the Clean Water Act. Kennedy’s test states that wetlands must have a “significant nexus” to a navigable water, meaning the wetland must have an identifiable physical, biological, or chemical connection to a waterbody you can float a boat on.

The Clean Water Rule was written to pass Kennedy’s test. The rule restores protections for 60% of our nation’s stream miles and millions of acres of wetlands. The lengthy rulemaking process was guided by the best available science and extensive stakeholder input, garnering about one million public comments. Of these one million comments, 87% were supportive of the rule.

By calling for a re-write of the Clean Water Rule, President Trump’s executive order therefore threatens Clean Water Act protections for these waters.

Prairie pothole wetlands in the US provide habitat for 40 species of breeding waterbirds, including American white pelicans and herons.

Prairie pothole wetlands in the US provide habitat for 40 species of breeding waterbirds, including American white pelicans and herons.

All water flows downstream and you cannot achieve the fundamental goal of the Clean Water Act without protecting upstream waters and stopping pollution at its source. Few would argue that Clean Water Act protections should not apply to the Colorado River, Chesapeake Bay, and the Great Lakes, but all these great waters begin as, and are fed by, headwater streams and springs upstream. The health of these small streams directly affects the water quality of our nation’s iconic waterbodies downstream.

Writing a new rule based on Scalia’s opinion would eliminate clean water protections for 60% of the nation’s stream miles and more than 20 million acres of wetlands nationwide. The 64 million acres of prairie pothole wetlands – shallow depressions filled with snowmelt and water in the spring – would also remain unprotected. These seasonal wetlands are home to more than half of North American migratory waterfowl including mallards, gadwall, and redhead ducks.

The 64 million acres of the prairie potholes that stretch across five Midwestern states have 18 species of waterfowl, 96 species of songbirds, 36 species of waterbirds, 17 species of raptors and 5 species of upland game birds. USFWS photo.

The 64 million acres of the prairie potholes that stretch across five Midwestern states have 18 species of waterfowl, 96 species of songbirds, 36 species of waterbirds, 17 species of raptors and 5 species of upland game birds.

The science does not support rolling back these Clean Water Act protections. This executive order is an attempt to change the inclusive legal standard determining what waters can be protected from pollution, and instead to adopt a new standard that doesn’t actually consider the science – a move that was rejected by the two previous administrations.

Science tells us is that headwater streams, tributaries, and nearby waters have a significant impact on downstream water quality. In order to fulfill President Trump’s campaign promise of “crystal clear water,” his administration will need to protect all of America’s waters, not just some of them.

We All Live Downstream - Don't roll back the clean water rule

Every American deserves access to drinkable, fishable, and swimmable water. An order that is neither guided by science nor likely to hold up in court is at odds with this promise. Instead, it leaves much of our nation’s drinking water and fish and wildlife habitat vulnerable to pollution threatening public health, wildlife habitat, and America’s outdoor heritage.

Since the order directs the EPA to begin a new rulemaking process, the public will have lots of opportunities to comment on a new rule. Stay tuned for your chance to talk about why clean water is so important to wildlife and to you. Sign up here to join the fight for wildlife and receive updates on actions you can take!

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South African rhino poaching numbers show need for urgent action http://wildlifepower.com/south-african-rhino-poaching/ Wed, 14 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=6554 South African rhino poaching numbers for the last year show a decline for the second consecutive year due to concerted conservation efforts. However, there is still a long road ahead as Africa continues to lose an average of three rhinos a day to the ongoing poaching crisis. In 2016 alone, 1,054 rhinos were reported killed […]

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South African rhino poaching numbers for the last year show a decline for the second consecutive year due to concerted conservation efforts. However, there is still a long road ahead as Africa continues to lose an average of three rhinos a day to the ongoing poaching crisis.

In 2016 alone, 1,054 rhinos were reported killed in South Africa. This is a slight decline from 1,175 in 2015 and 1,215 in 2014. The 2016 figures represent a loss in rhinos of approximately 6% in South Africa, which is close to the birth rate, meaning the population remains perilously close to the tipping point.

Criminals kill rhinos for their horns, which are mistakenly believed to cure a variety of ailments from fevers to blood disorders to hangovers.

Other major South African rhino range states in Africa have reported declines, with 61 rhinos reported killed in Namibia, down from 91 in 2015. South Africa, Namibia, and Zimbabwe are home to nearly 95 percent of all remaining African rhinos.

South African rhino poaching numbers show need for urgent action

South Africa’s Kruger National Park, home to the world’s largest white rhino population, successfully achieved a decline in the number of poached rhinos last year, despite an increase in the number of reported illegal entries into the 4.8 million acre park.

These latest figures highlight the impacts of poaching sweeping across South Africa as criminal syndicates shift their focus in response to law enforcement actions. Key populations in the South African province KwaZulu-Natal bore the brunt of the poaching, with 161 rhinos killed in 2016—an increase of 38% from the previous year.

We need to act now
Wildlife crime is the most immediate threat to wild rhinos, elephants, and tigers. Demand for South African rhino horns—along with elephant ivory and tiger products—runs rampant in parts of the world, particularly in Asia.

WWF works to stop rhino poaching and emphasizes the need for not just law enforcement response, but also involvement of local communities around protected areas.

Together, we need to commit to long-term demand reduction efforts to protect rhinos.

Take action to stop wildlife crime.

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Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests http://wildlifepower.com/five-animals-depend-forests/ Tue, 13 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=1441 Forests are magnificent places teeming with a huge diversity of life. They are essential for life on Earth. They impact our lives in so many ways, from the air we breathe to the wood we use. Eight of 10 species found on land live in forests, and almost 300 million people, particularly in developing countries, […]

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Forests are magnificent places teeming with a huge diversity of life. They are essential for life on Earth. They impact our lives in so many ways, from the air we breathe to the wood we use. Eight of 10 species found on land live in forests, and almost 300 million people, particularly in developing countries, live in forests, too.

Despite the fact that forests are so important to us, and to many different species, we are losing them at an alarming rate. This is due mainly to expanding agriculture, an increased population, and shifts in diet. Once a forest is lost to unsustainable agriculture, it is usually gone forever—along with many of the plants and animals that once lived there. WWF is working to address the threats to forests: By 2020, we must conserve the world’s most important forests to sustain nature’s diversity, benefit our climate, and support well-being.

Check out some of the animals who hang out in forests:

1. Tree Kangaroo
Tree kangaroos live in lowland and mountainous rainforests in Papua New Guinea, Indonesia, and the far north of Queensland, Australia. They have adapted to life in the trees, with shorter legs and stronger forelimbs for climbing. They are the largest tree-dwelling mammals in Australia. Like all macropods, instead of sweating, tree kangaroos lick their forearms and allow the evaporation to help cool their bodies when hot. Many tree kangaroo species are incredibly rare and most are decreasing in number. They face habitat loss through deforestation.

Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

2. Giant Panda
Pandas live mainly in bamboo forests high in the mountains of western China, where they subsist almost entirely on bamboo. They play a crucial role in the bamboo forests by spreading seeds and facilitating growth of vegetation. Panda’s suffer from habitat loss due to the construction of roads and railroads, which fragment the forest, isolating panda populations and preventing mating, as well as reducing pandas’ access to the bamboo they need to survive. WWF has been helping with the Chinese government’s National Conservation Program for the giant panda and its habitat. Thanks to this program, panda reserves now cover more than 3.8 million acres of forest.

Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

3. Saola
Saolas are one of the rarest and most threatened mammals on the planet. They are a cousin of cattle but resemble antelope. They are critically endangered and are found only in the Annamite Mountains of Vietnam and Laos. As forests disappear under the chainsaw to make way for agriculture, plantations and infrastructure, saola are being squeezed into smaller spaces. Rapid and large-scale infrastructure in the region is also fragmenting saola habitat. WWF has been involved with the protection of the saola since its discovery, strengthening and establishing protected areas as well as working on research, community based forest management, capacity building, and strengthening law enforcement.

Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

4. Orangutan
The name orangutan means “man of the forest” in the Malay language, and they are the world’s largest tree-climbing mammal. They make nests of trees of vegetation to sleep in at night and rest in during the day. They are “gardeners” of the forest, playing a vital role in seed dispersal in their habitats. Their habitat is fast disappearing to make way for oil palm plantations and other agricultural plantations. Today, more than 50% of orangutans are found outside protected areas in forests under management by timber, palm oil, and mining companies. Orangutans live on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra. The island of Sumatra has lost 85% of its forests and a similar level of destruction is taking place on the island of Borneo. WWF works in Borneo and Sumatra to secure well-managed protected areas and wider forest landscapes to connect sub-populations of orangutans.

Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

5. African Forest Elephant
African forest elephants inhabit the dense rainforests of west and central Africa. They are smaller than African savanna elephants, with more oval-shaped ears and straighter tusks that point downward. By eating more fruits from more tree species than probably any other large vertebrate, forest elephants are essential for the dispersal and germination of many rain forest trees. For some of these species, their seeds will only germinate after passing through the elephant’s digestive tract. In short, elephants are true forest gardeners. Their range has been shrinking rapidly from 3 million square miles in 1979 to less than 1 million square miles today. Poaching has further decimated their remaining populations by over 65% from 2002 to 2013. These elephants are being pushed into smaller islands of protected areas, further hindering their freedom to roam and long term survival.

Living among the trees: Five animals that depend on forests

Learn more about forest habitats.

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Tiny Baby Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo http://wildlifepower.com/tiny-baby-giraffe-denver-zoo/ Mon, 12 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=8089 Kipele, an older giraffe at the Denver Zoo in Colorado, was believed to be past reproductive age. At 23 years old, she is middle-aged, right around the giraffe equivalent of menopause. In fact, the Denver Post notes, “Kipele is the oldest of the zoo’s giraffes.” Zookeepers put her on birth control just in case, but they didn’t […]

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Kipele, an older giraffe at the Denver Zoo in Colorado, was believed to be past reproductive age. At 23 years old, she is middle-aged, right around the giraffe equivalent of menopause.

In fact, the Denver Post notes, “Kipele is the oldest of the zoo’s giraffes.” Zookeepers put her on birth control just in case, but they didn’t think she would need it.

Still, you know the expression, “the best laid plans of mice and men often go awry?” Apparently, it applies to giraffes too.

Tiny Baby Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo

Dobby the baby giraffe made his first public debut at the Denver Zoo on March 5, 2017, after completely stunning handlers and zookeepers with his unexpected birth.

Giraffe pregnancies last between 13 and 15 months, and his mom Kipele was believed to be too old to carry a baby.

For months, nobody realized that her birth control had failed and that Kipele was preparing to become a mom.

Shortly before she delivered, folks at the zoo noticed her belly and udders swelling and realized that, against all odds, Kipele was getting ready to deliver a miracle baby!

Sweet little Dobby was born in late February 2017. He weighed in at just 73 pounds, and measured 5 feet tall.

That might be the size of a human 5th grader, but it’s on the small side for an baby giraffe. They are usually more like 6 feet and 150 pounds.

Just one day after his surprise arrival, zoo staff realized that Dobby wasn’t thriving as much as they expected.

He seemed sluggish and sickly, and was having trouble standing and nursing. Most baby giraffes walk straight away.

Tiny Newborn Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo

They quickly realized Dobby’s problem. His immune system didn’t receive enough antibodies in utero, so he was having more trouble fighting off diseases.

Staff aren’t sure exactly why Dobby’s immune system was a bit underdeveloped. It might have to do with his mama’s relatively advanced age, or because he wasn’t monitored in the early stages of the pregnancy, because his mom kept her pregnancy secret up until about a week before the birth.

Zookeepers think it’s most likely because Kipele herself was under the weather for much of her pregnancy.

Fortunately, the Denver Zoo was able to spring into action.

Tiny Newborn Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo

An innovative program at the nearby Cheyenne Mountain Zoo came to the rescue. Giraffes there had been trained to voluntarily allow doctors to draw blood.

Thanks to the giraffes at Cheyenne, Denver Zoo was able to give little Dobby blood and plasma transfusions right away.

The donated plasma helped Dobby to build up his immune system, and his health improved fast!

Tiny Newborn Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo

Now, Dobby is feeling much happier and healthier, and is growing fast. In just his first week, he has gained 10 pounds!

And on March 6th, just one week after his surprise birth, the baby giraffe was ready for a major rite of passage.

He had his formal debut at the Denver Zoo, where 300 people turned out to see the baby giraffe in action!

Tiny Newborn Giraffe Makes His Very First Appearance At The Denver Zoo

Brave Dobby took a quick run around his enclosure to check out all the faces before getting overwhelmed and running back to Mom.

It’s not easy to be a celebrity when you’re just a week old, after all. Still, we have no doubt that Dobby will overcome his shyness in no time!

If you think Dobby is incredibly adorable, be sure to check out the video below and SHARE his amazing and unexpected story with friends and family!

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Laying the supportive groundwork for snow leopard conservation in Sikkim http://wildlifepower.com/snow-leopard-conservation-sikkim/ Sat, 10 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=4822 Phuchung Lachenpa is most at home in the high mountain valleys of India’s eastern Himalaya, which towers over his hometown of Lachen in Sikkim. A yak herder and trekking guide, he is intimately familiar with the local mountains and the Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve, which protects the eastern half of the world’s third-highest mountain. Today, he […]

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Phuchung Lachenpa is most at home in the high mountain valleys of India’s eastern Himalaya, which towers over his hometown of Lachen in Sikkim. A yak herder and trekking guide, he is intimately familiar with the local mountains and the Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve, which protects the eastern half of the world’s third-highest mountain. Today, he wanders these mountains as a citizen scientist, documenting the elusive snow leopard for the USAID-funded WWF Asia High Mountains Project.

Laying the supportive groundwork for snow leopard conservation in Sikkim

After being trained by WWF in July 2015, Phuchung and five other local citizen scientists, began the challenging work of setting up camera traps in remote Himalayan valleys. By periodically moving a set of 22 camera traps, their aim was to survey nearly 198,000 acres of potential snow leopard range in northeast Sikkim to establish the first baseline count for the local snow leopard population there.

Results were immediate. In August 2015, Phuchung went to retrieve a camera trap in a high valley near sacred Gurudongmar Lake and was rewarded with the first photos ever taken of a snow leopard in North Sikkim District.

During this first survey, it took Phuchung and his team eight months to cover all the selected survey sites with their camera traps. They would set up cameras, retrieve them after about two months, and then shift them to a different location. By the end of these eight months, snow leopards had been photographed at four different survey sites.

Community engagement
The success of this mission was in no small part due to Phuchung’s familiarity with these mountains.

“I was approached because camera traps had been set up in our mountains before, but nobody had been able to capture a single snow leopard on camera,” Phuchung said. “I thought this was a challenge that I was well suited for.”

Even as WWF scientists began identifying sites for the survey, they looked to Phuchung and other knowledgeable community members. Locations were jointly chosen.

Phuchung Lachenpa looking out with binoculars.
Phuchung Lachenpa

Before this project, Phuchung worried that such local insight of Lachen’s mountains will be lost with the rapid changes in lifestyles that have accompanied the fast pace of development in North Sikkim. But as work progressed, other community members—including young people—regularly brought Phuchung new information on snow leopard signs and sightings, which also informed his work. Today, he has a team of five young men who are eager to learn more about their local snow leopards and camera trapping survey techniques. They’ll be the local guardians of North Sikkim’s snow leopards for decades to come.

A foundation for the future
The camera trap photos collected by Phuchung and his team revealed five unique snow leopard individuals present in the survey region, adding an important new dimension to existing knowledge on snow leopard populations in this range area.

With proof of this magnificent cat’s presence in North Sikkim, groundwork for improving snow leopard conservation efforts in this region are now being laid.

Notably, survey findings will also be used to inform ongoing snow leopard conservation efforts in the adjacent Kanchenjunga Conservation Area in northeast Nepal to the west as well as in contiguous snow leopard range areas of Bhutan to the east.

The first ever snow leopard to be collared using GPS technology in Nepal was found to regularly cross the international border between Nepal and Sikkim, which has highlighted the critical importance of the Khangchendzonga Biosphere Reserve as a transboundary corridor for this iconic high mountain species.

Now with this important companion initiative in Sikkim providing photographic evidence of snow leopard population size and migration routes, the stage is being set for the first robust, evidence-based transboundary conservation efforts in critical snow leopard range areas of the eastern Himalayas.

Learn more about community-based, transboundary conservation

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WWF leads snare removal from injured female gorilla http://wildlifepower.com/snare-removal-female-gorilla/ Fri, 09 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=1416 Wusa was a dedicated gorilla mother, doing her best to care for her three-month-old infant. But WWF staffers noticed something amiss with the adult female gorilla in the Dzanag-Sangha Protected Areas of the Central African Republic. Her wrist was caught in a metal snare. Snares are generally intended to catch small mammals in the forests. […]

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Wusa was a dedicated gorilla mother, doing her best to care for her three-month-old infant. But WWF staffers noticed something amiss with the adult female gorilla in the Dzanag-Sangha Protected Areas of the Central African Republic. Her wrist was caught in a metal snare.

Snares are generally intended to catch small mammals in the forests. But great apes like Wusa can accidentally get caught and injured by them. If not treated, these snare-inflicted injuries can result in infection and eventually death. The metal snare embedding itself into Wusa’s wrist was causing her hand to swell and preventing her from putting weight on that hand, making mobility and caring for her three-month old infant difficult.

WWF Primate Habitation Program staff alerted veterinary colleagues about the snare by email and phone. Dr. Christopher Whittier departed Boston the next day and once in the CAR joined the PHP team to find Wusa. Together, they tracked the female gorilla for a day and a half before finally getting close enough to administer anesthetic.

WWF leads snare removal from injured female gorilla Wusa
Wusa and her baby. Wusa’s hand was swollen from the metal snare, making mobility and caring for her infant difficult.

With a new baby and a human-caused injury, Wusa was understandably very guarded and stuck closely to the group’s silverback gorilla leader, Mata. Initially, Wusa immediately ran away after being darted, with trackers scrambling to find her. As the immobilization drugs began to take effect, Mata became very upset and was trying to protect Wusa, but eventually retreated with Wusa’s baby under his protection. The trackers monitored Mata and the infant’s whereabouts while Dr. Whittier and the team were able to remove the snare and treat Wusa.

The team stayed close to Wusa as she recovered from the anesthetic and confirmed she returned to her group, where she was quickly reunited with her baby. She was observed resuming her normal behaviors including climbing and putting pressure on the injured arm.

Western lowland gorillas like Wusa are Critically Endangered. Their survival depends on establishing and managing protected areas like the Dzanga-Sangh Protected Areas (DSPA) where Wusa lives. DSPA is co-managed by WWF and the Central African Republic government, with most of the funding coming from WWF and the Sangha Tri-National Foundation.

Learn more about WWF’s work with Western lowland gorillas.

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Vaquita population drops to agonizing 30 individuals http://wildlifepower.com/vaquita-population-drops/ Thu, 08 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=1411 There is grim news for the world’s most endangered porpoise. A survey conducted last summer and just released last week estimates vaquita numbers are as low as 30 individuals. That’s half of what the vaquita population was just last year. And less than a third of its population in 2014. Why are their numbers at an […]

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There is grim news for the world’s most endangered porpoise. A survey conducted last summer and just released last week estimates vaquita numbers are as low as 30 individuals. That’s half of what the vaquita population was just last year. And less than a third of its population in 2014.

Why are their numbers at an all-time low? Human activities, specifically bycatch – fishing nets that inadvertently catch and drown the porpoise. Vaquitas share waters with the much sought-after totoaba fish. The totoaba’s bladder is a highly prized delicacy in Asia and is illegally traded en route to China from Mexico and through the US.

The only way to save the vaquita from extinction is if the Mexican government bans all fisheries within their habitat. Such a ban must be fully carried out by law enforcement. And economic alternatives must be found for fishing communities so they may have more sustainable livelihoods. The Mexican government has taken a number of steps to protect them since 2004. They established a Vaquita Refuge in the northern Gulf of California to protect the core range of the vaquita population, and initiated a plan of monetary compensation to fishermen who relied on this area to make their living.

Other governments must also do their part. The US needs to immediately stop transborder shipments of totoaba products. China should end to the illegal transport and sale of totoaba products.

All three governments must take action immediately.

Vaquita population drops to agonizing 30 individuals

WWF is committed to working with the Mexican government and the international community to ensure a future of the vaquita as well as sustainable livelihoods for local communities. We are working to stop gillnet fishing and “ghost nets” within vaquita habitat in addition to finding new vaquita-safe fishing techniques.

Just a decade ago, the Chinese river dolphin was driven to extinction. Today we are on the brink of losing a second cetacean species. We cannot allow this to happen.

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NWF Supporters Lend Their Voice to Protect Wildlife Habitat http://wildlifepower.com/protect-wildlife-habitat/ Sat, 03 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=1056 The expansion of cattle ranching is one of the leading drivers of deforestation in species-rich areas, like the Amazon rainforest. When tied to deforestation, cattle products such as beef, leather, and tallow can have detrimental effects on climate and wildlife habitat. Furthermore, recent developments in U.S. trade policy mean that beef products from the Brazilian Amazon, which […]

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The expansion of cattle ranching is one of the leading drivers of deforestation in species-rich areas, like the Amazon rainforest. When tied to deforestation, cattle products such as beef, leather, and tallow can have detrimental effects on climate and wildlife habitat. Furthermore, recent developments in U.S. trade policy mean that beef products from the Brazilian Amazon, which may be linked to deforestation and habitat destruction, could end up in North American supermarkets, restaurants, or fast food chains. This presents a timely and meaningful opportunity for consumers in the U.S. to voice their opinions about this important issue and send a strong signal in support of products that are more sustainable and that help protect wildlife.

Environmental impacts can’t be ignored
NWF Supporters Lend Their Voice to Protect Wildlife Habitat

The National Wildlife Federation’s International Wildlife Conservation team created a survey to assess concerns about the potential impact of cattle ranching on tropical rainforests and wildlife. The survey sought to gather insights about consumer preferences for products that are more environmentally friendly, such as beef products that are covered under “zero deforestation” policies. The responses from the 6,000 supporters who participated in the survey sends a clear message to companies: the beef sold in our markets and restaurants should not harm the environment or destroy wildlife habitat!

Working together to incentivize company action

NWF Supporters Lend Their Voice to Protect Tropical Rainforest Wildlife Habitat 2
Generally, “zero deforestation” commitments and policies prohibit farmers and ranchers from clearing or converting forests for agricultural use. The NWF’s International Wildlife Conservation team works to advance “zero deforestation” agricultural production in tropical regions by collaborating with companies to develop and strengthen policies that safeguard tropical forests and protect wildlife habitat. Armed with the collective voice of its supporters, the NWF is able to reinforce the message that companies can benefit from adopting and strengthening their commitments to “zero deforestation” beef. Through effective collaboration, the International Wildlife Conservation team aims to support sustainable production systems on the ground, promoting win-win solutions for the environment, wildlife, and people.

NWF Supporters Lend Their Voice to Protect Tropical Rainforest Wildlife Habitat 3

Coatis can be found across South America, including in Amazonian rainforests. They turn treetops into their bedrooms, building nests in the branches for their young.

What about other food products?

Several participants from the survey expressed that although they do not eat beef products, they are still concerned about the environmental impact of their food purchases. To address these concerns, the International Wildlife Conservation team is planning a follow-up blog about soy, another major commodity that is driving tropical deforestation and the loss of critical wildlife habitat.

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Camera Catches Polar Bear Nora Flopping Belly First Into The Water http://wildlifepower.com/camera-catches-polar-bear-nora/ Fri, 02 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=4318 During the winter, many people take the Polar Bear Plunge to raise money for charity. They all run into freezing cold water, typically they aren’t wear too much clothing. While humans around the world do this, polar bear Nora took the plunge all on her own. At the Oregon Zoo, Nora is a 1-year-old polar […]

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During the winter, many people take the Polar Bear Plunge to raise money for charity. They all run into freezing cold water, typically they aren’t wear too much clothing. While humans around the world do this, polar bear Nora took the plunge all on her own.

At the Oregon Zoo, Nora is a 1-year-old polar bear that came to the Oregon Zoo from the Columbus Zoo.

Camera Catches Polar Bear Nora Flopping Belly First Into The Water

Zookeepers must have been very happy to see this young girl having some fun, as the beginning of her life was a bit sad. Nora’s mother stopped caring for her after she was 1-week-old, and zookeepers at the Columbus Zoo had to hand-rear her.

She then was brought to the Oregon Zoo, where she was caught on camera having the time of her life around her pool. Polar bear Nora dove, swam, and played with her toy, having an absolute blast in the water!

Zoo visitors adore this sweet girl and after watching her play so happily, it’s easy to see why! Have you ever seen a polar bear having so much fun at the zoo?

 

Polar bears are highly dependent on older stable pack ice in the Arctic region, where they spend much of their time on the ice hunting, mating and denning. They are generally solitary as adults, except during breeding and cub rearing. Polar bears are strong swimmers, and individuals have been seen in open Arctic waters as far as 200 miles from land, although swimming long distances is not preferred since it requires so much energy for adults and can be fatal to younger bears. Their fur is thicker than any other bears’ and covers even their feet for warmth and traction on ice. A thick layer of blubber beneath their fur provides buoyancy and insulation.

Please SHARE this adorable polar bear with all of your friends and family to give them a reason to smile today!

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Man Bends Down To Pet Sleeping Lion, But Has No Idea Of Sneaking Leopard Behind Him http://wildlifepower.com/sneaking-leopard-behind/ Thu, 01 Jun 2017 00:37:00 +0000 http://viralligator.com/?p=10548 Eduardo Serio founded the Black Jaguar White Tiger foundation so he could save wild cats from dangerous living conditions and provide them with a second chance. One day, he learned just how much the animals he rescued appreciated the kind of life he gave them. He was kneeling down beside a group of lions as […]

The post Man Bends Down To Pet Sleeping Lion, But Has No Idea Of Sneaking Leopard Behind Him appeared first on Wildlifepower.

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Man Bends Down To Pet Sleeping Lion, But Has No Idea Of Sneaking Leopard Behind Him

Eduardo Serio founded the Black Jaguar White Tiger foundation so he could save wild cats from dangerous living conditions and provide them with a second chance.

One day, he learned just how much the animals he rescued appreciated the kind of life he gave them.

He was kneeling down beside a group of lions as they relaxed in the fresh air and sunshine of their sanctuary. A man behind the camera joked with Eduardo as he played on one of the lion’s stomachs as if it were a set of drums. The cat rescuer was certainly having a great time, until the unthinkable happened.

In the video below a sneaking leopard emerges on camera and starts walking towards Eduardo and his lion friends. The leopard is sneaking up on his handler from afar and suddenly breaks into a sprint.

As the leopard rushes toward Eduardo, looking as if he’s ready to attack, a nearby tiger spots his urgency.

The tiger quickly connects the dots and jumps up. He knows his handler needs protection.

Instantly, the large tiger pounces at the leopard, causing him to jump in the air. The leopard dodges the tiger and continues running to Eduardo. Luckily, the cat rescuer turns around just in time.

He freezes at first, but tries to move out of the way once the tiger catches up to the leopard and ruins his tackle.

Let’s just say that this tiger’s love for Eduardo probably saved his life that day.

Leopards are nocturnal animals, meaning they are active at night. During the day, they rest in thick brush or in trees. Leopards are solitary, preferring to live alone. They are very agile and good swimmers. They are able to leap more than 20 feet.

Check out the incredible footage of the sneaking leopard and protective tiger below and please SHARE this story if you think this tiger is as loyal as they come!

The post Man Bends Down To Pet Sleeping Lion, But Has No Idea Of Sneaking Leopard Behind Him appeared first on Wildlifepower.

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